CPI In the News | Chatsworth Products

CPI in the News

In the News - Inside Networks

Cooling and Climate Management

Luca Rozzoni, CPI Senior Product Manager for Europe. Featured in September 2016 edition of Inside Networks

Luca Rozzoni explains why it is vital to be aware of the new thermal management strategies and intelligent technologies that can proactively create efficiency and impact data center optimization.



In the News - Data Center Fronter

The Case for Three Phase PDUs

Luca Rozzoni, CPI Senior Product Manager for Europe. Featured in July 2016 on Data Center Frontier

The data center of the future requires an infrastructure that is agile, scalable and flexible. Since power is what keeps equipment running, it is important to deploy a rack-mount PDU that supports such high demands.



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Data Center Game Changers

Brian Barth with contributions from Sam Rodriguez, CPI Product Manager. Printed in the May/June 2015 edition of GBD Magazine.

Chatsworth Products is refining the art and science of keeping critical IT. When Seattle-based TeleCommunication Systems (TCS) began drawing up plans for a new data center several years ago, they ran into a slight problem. The local utility company said the grid didn’t have enough available power to support the expansion. It is exactly this equation that Chatsworth Products specializes in solving.



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Protecting Telecommunications Equipment in Seismic Areas

Sam Rodriguez, RCDD, CPI Sr. Product Manager. Printed in the November/December 2014 edition of ICT Today Magazine.

Planning a data center in a seismically active area requires careful consideration on many levels. Though seismic events are more common in the state of California, there are other parts of the United States where earthquakes are not uncommon. It is much easier to prepare for the next earthquake, than to predict when it will happen. 



The Airflow Containment Thermal Revolution

The Airflow Containment Thermal Revolution

Raissa Carey, eContent Specialist, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Mission Critical Magazine, July/August 2014

Airflow containment — the ability to isolate, redirect, and recycle hot exhaust air has revolutionized the idea of “free cooling” within the data center. The energy saving benefits are so convincing, new laws are being passed requiring the use of airflow containment to comply with strict energy efficiency guidelines for data centers.



CNS Magazine July/August 2012 cover

The Changing Data Centre

Denise Deveau, with contributions from CPI Global Technology Manager, Ian Seaton, and CPI National Sales Manager for Canada, Stew Munns. Printed in the July/August 2012 edition of CNS Magazine. 

Trade costs have skyrocketed, virtualization is driving up energy consumption and generating more heat, certification requirements are increasingly stringent, permit requirements more prolific, and uptime expectations higher. It all adds up to a close look at today's data center in a state of flux and how to address the changes.



BICSI NEWS JULY AUGUST 2012

Embracing the Benefits of Data Center Containment

Ian Seaton, Global Technology Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in BICSI News, July/August 2012

Data center airflow containment is the most cost-effective and least disruptive path toward maximizing efficiency gains and reducing data center operating costs. However, there is one slight paradigm shift that, while not necessary, can significantly help with embracing data center containment—the data center can be viewed, not as a room full of computers, but as an industrial process.



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Data at its Centre

Daniel Shane, Editor, Network Middle East Magazine. Printed in the February 2012 Edition of Network Middle East Magazine.

CPI Regional Sales Manager for the Middle East, Sundeep Raina, joins three of the region's most prominent IT vendors to discuss data center trends for 2012 and beyond in this thought-provoking and informative piece from Network Middle East Magazine.



BICSI News September 2011

Understanding How Cabinet Door Perforation Impacts Airflow

Travis North, Thermal Design Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in BICSI News, September/October 2011

There's long been a debate that the higher you climb in cabinet door perforation percentage, the better your airflow, and in turn, the better your ability to support high-density heat loads (30 kW and beyond). This has helped push the envelope towards 80 percent perforation in some cabinet models. But is it true? Does a higher cabinet perforation of 80 percent really optimize airflow that much better than a closer-to-standard 64 percent cabinet door? Read on to find out. 



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Network Middle East - CPI Regional Sales Profile

Daniel Shane, Editor - Network Middle East Magazine. Printed in Network Middle East Magazine, July 2011

Since opening a Chatsworth Products, Inc. international office in Dubai three years ago, CPI's presence in the Middle East has grown an astounding 380% by way of regional sales. With such success, the Middle East IT and data center market have taken notice. In its July 2011 issue, Network Middle East magazine, one of the region's foremost authorities on the IT market in the Middle East, features this profile of Sundeep Raina, CPI Regional Sales Manager for the Middle East.



BICSI News Magazine July/August 2010

Airflow Containment: The Road to Data Center Efficiency

by Chris Jaggers, Director of Design Engineering and Travis North, Thermal Design Engineer, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in BICSI News, July/August 2010

As compute capability and power density continue to rise with each generation of server products, the requirement for traditional data centers to efficiently support increased rack density becomes critical. To place this in perspective, a study by Intel illustrated that the same compute capability in 2002 that required 25 racks and consumed 128 kilowatts(kW) of power (5.1 kW/rack) could be replaced in 2008 by a single rack of servers requiring only 21 kW of power (21 kW/rack). Download entire article.



BICSI News Magazine July/August 2009

Data Center Thermal Management A Holistic Approach to Energy Efficiency

 by Ian Seaton, Technical Applications Development Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in BICSI News, July/August 2009

How important is data center thermal management energy efficiency? How about cashing in a 50% reduction in cooling energy on a one megawatt data center for $1.9 million savings over the life of the data center? (Savings based on fifteen year life of data center, $0.08 per kilowatt hour electricity cost and power usage effectiveness improvement from 2.0 to 1.63.)



CNS Magazine March/April 2011

A Band Called Bent Metal

Paul Barker, Editor - Cabling Networking Systems (CNS) Magazine. Printed in CNS Magazine, March/April 2011.

During the 2011 BICSI Winter Conference in Orlando, FL., Chatsworth Products, Inc. stole the show with a special evening performance by Bent Metal, an all CPI-employee rock band with plenty of musical skill and a special nod towards IT infrastructure in the lyrics and songwriting department. Since then, many new fans have been won over by Bent Metal's infectious brand of "rack n' roll," including Paul Barker, the Editor of the Canadian-based Cabling Networking Systems (CNS) Magazine. Read his take on the evening, Bent Metal, and CPI's unique brand of company identity and ownership in the article link below.



Business Management Magazine, January 2008

Executive Roundtable: Driving Data Center Efficiency

Business Management Magazine, January 2008

A new wave of storage solutions is emerging that offer greener, more energy efficient approaches to IT. Business Management spoke to Bruce Shaw, Director of Server and Workstation Marketing at AMD, Ian Seaton, Technology Marketing Manager for Chatsworth Products, and Lorie Wigle, Director of Server Technology and Initiatives Marketing for Intel, to find out how companies can reduce their energy costs and improve data center efficiencies.



Mission Critical Magazine, February 2008

High Performance Data Centers Call for Innovative Cooling Techniques

by Brian Donowho, Senior Product Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Mission Critical Magazine, February 2008

Over 80% of today’s data center managers identify thermal management as their greatest challenge. This is no surprise considering the average heat load generated per cabinet by new equipment has doubled since 2000. This excess heat generated by equipment can concentrate within the cabinet and cause equipment to critically overheat and shutdown, costing companies large amounts of time and money.



Business Management Magazine, January 2008

Hot Air Isolation Cools High-Density Data Centers

by Ian Seaton, Technology Marketing Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Business Management Magazine, January 2008

Contrary to some beliefs, air is quite capable of dissipating heat loads in excess of 30 kW per rack, and can do so quite economically. This is great news to the 92% of data center managers who have not yet tried liquid cooling and the 65% who said they would never use liquid cooling in their data centers, according to a SearchDataCenter.com survey.



Cabling Installation & Maintenance Magazine, September 2007

Hot Air Isolation Enables Air Cooling in High Density Data Centers

by Ian Seaton, Technology Marketing Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Cabling Installation & Maintenance Magazine, September 2007

 "The first paragraph of an article on cooling data centers will give away its age. When I first started writing and speaking about thermal management in data centers some seven to eight years ago, I always felt compelled to open with a review of the heat density forecasts from ASHRAE and the Uptime Institute with the motive of scaring the reader or listener into staying with me to the end. Such rhetorical ploys are no longer necessary, so instead I can get right to the point: Contrary to some well-intentioned and much self-serving sound and fury, air is quite capable of dissipating heat loads in excess of 30 kW per rack, and doing it quite economically. That will be good news to the 92% of data center managers who have not yet tried liquid cooling and the 65% who said they would never use liquid cooling in their data centers, according to a SearchDataCenter.com survey.¹"



Communication News Magazine, March 2008

How to Decrease Data Centers Cooling Costs up to 40%

by Ian Seaton, Technology Marketing Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Communication News Magazine, March 2008

Case studies have shown that by employing passive cooling technology to overcome thermal challenges, you can decrease data center cooling costs up to 40%. The basic principle of passive cooling technology involves using the equipment cabinet as an architectural feature in the data center that secures the isolation between chilled supply air and heated return air. When using a ducted exhaust cabinet, this isolation can effectively cool heat loads in excess of 20 kW per cabinet, while maximizing cooling unit efficiency and allowing the air temperature in the data center to be increased.



Thermal News Magazine, Winter 2007/2008

How to Properly Manage Network Switch Equipment in Cabinet Spaces

by Nicole McLawhorn, Public Relations/Advertising Specialist, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Thermal News Magazine, Winter 2007/2008

The heart of your network infrastructure is based on the survival of your core network switches. When employing side-to-side airflow, network switches located in cabinets positioned in a hot aisle/cold aisle layout run the risk of re-consuming hot exhaust air, causing elevated intake temperatures which ultimately results in equipment failure. Network switches, specifically Cisco 6500 and 9500 series, utilize this side-to-side airflow pattern by drawing cold air in through the right side of the chassis and releasing hot air out of the left side. The hot exhaust air from one switch will repeatedly flow into the air intake of the adjacent switch, creating problems, especially when these switches are installed in a typical cabinet.



Electrical Contracting Products Magazine, January 2008

Rack 'em Up: Proper cable management is key to network survival

by Nicole McLawhorn, Public Relations/Advertising Specialist, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Electrical Contracting Products Magazine, January 2008

Without proper cable management your network has little chance for survival. Cables are frequently required to change direction and incorrectly doing so can cause sharp bends or kinks, which can modify the electrical properties of the cables by altering the size, twist rate, relative proximities or lengths of the individual conductors. In addition, tight bundling or improper support of cables can deform, stretch or add tension to the cable, negatively affecting the overall performance and ultimately creating costly downtime.



Business Management Magazine, April 2008

Streamlining the Data Center with High-Density Cabling Solutions

by Brian Donowho, Senior Product Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. and Alan Ugolini, Corning Cable Systems Printed in Business Management Magazine, April 2008

Enterprise data centers are undergoing a transformation driven by the need to reduce operating costs and increase performance. This can be in direct conflict with strategic business requirements reflected on the data center to increase the ability to adapt to rapid market changes. Data center growth and systems turnover driven by events such as consolidation, disaster recovery, application growth and digital data growth, increase data center cost and complexity. New technology solutions such as server virtualization, storage area networks (SANs), 10 Gigabit Ethernet and InfiniBand are being deployed throughout the data center to address business needs and meet data center requirements of reducing operating costs and increasing performance.



Thermal News Magazine, Winter 2008/2009

The Data Center Cooling Problem Solved

by Ian Seaton, Technology Marketing Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Thermal News Magazine, Winter 2008/2009

Passive air cooling solutions not only offer the most efficient way to cool today's increasing density requirements, but present huge energy saving and a lower initial investment compared to close-coupled and liquid cooled solutions. Passive air cooling can successfully dissipate as much heat as can be generated by commercial servers that fit into a 42 to 45 U cabinet, and in fact more than most close-coupled and liquid-cooled solutions. Based on complete isolation between hot exhaust and cool supply air, passive air cooling solutions provide access to lower data cente cooling, which translates into increased supply air temperatures and decreased energy consumption.



Cabling Installation & Maintenance Magazine, February 2009

Passive Cooling Solution Reduces Energy Expenses

by Nicole McLawhorn, Public Relations/Advertising Specialist, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Cabling Installation & Maintenance Magazine, February 2009

CDW Corporation is a leading provider of technology solutions, including unified communications, security, remote managed services, informationworker solutions, and virtualization and optimization. The company’s high-tech data centers deliver hosted applications, co-location and managed services to clients nationwide. To sustain current and future growth CDW recently built a new enterprise hosting center located just outside of Madison, WI that provides customers with a state-of-the-art facility for securing and managing their mission-critical information technology (IT) infrastructure equipment.



Equipment Protection Magazine, March 2009

Specifying Equipment Racks for Seismic Environments

by Alan Taft, Senior Product Manager, Chatsworth Products, Inc. Printed in Equipment Protection Magazine, March 2009

What constitutes a potential seismic environment? Well, just about anywhere on earth is subject to seismic events. It has happened in the past and will definitely happen again in the future, it is just a matter of time and pressure. On any given day, per the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) the earth experiences approximately 25 earthquakes with a magnitude of 2.5 or above on the Richter scale. They may not all be felt but with today’s seismic instrumentation most are measured and recorded. The NEIC now locates approximately 14,000 earthquakes per year. Of those, approximately 18 per year are expected to be in the major earthquake category of between 7.0 to 7.9 and 1 catastrophic earthquake per year above 8.0.